Published On: October 8, 2021|563 words|2.8 min read|
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Working in the Construction Industry

Working in the construction industry requires lots of hard work, precision and skill. The hours can often be long, the labour strenuous, and the conditions can be dangerous without the correct health and safety awareness. But with hard work comes reward, and seeing an empty plot of land transform into a home that you helped build is just that – rewarding.

For those working within the labouring trade, a typical day might involve starting work around 7 or 8 am, ready to begin labouring anytime after 8. In the UK, noisy operations generally take place between 8 am – 6 pm on weekdays and 9 am – 2 pm on Saturdays with Sundays off, so working hours will typically fall within this time frame.

Before going onsite, workers need to be equipped with the correct gear. This may vary depending on where the job is but will often include a hard hat, steel cap boots and/or a high vis jacket. A morning meeting would typically take place before any labour begins, where the onsite manager or health and safety professional can brief the team accordingly.

Within the construction trade, there are lots of different jobs that workers can specialise in. Amongst the most common are; electrician, bricklayer, heavy equipment operator, carpenter, scaffolder and welder.

The rate of pay can vary drastically depending on which path you decide to go down. Many labouring and trades jobs offer a flat daily rate whilst higher-skilled jobs, such as site manager or surveyor positions, are likely to offer more competitive salaries. According to a report by Linear Recruitment, the average industry salary for a construction worker is £45,774 annually, 15% higher than the UK average salary.

The average day rate for general labourers is £98 per day and £400 for construction managers. General labouring jobs are a great place to start before working your way up to more skilled, managerial positions. Naturally, the rate of pay will differ depending on which company you work for and where you are based so it is important to bear this in mind.

The courses we offer include:

At Complete Training Solutions, we offer a range of different CITB construction training courses to ensure you are equipped with the essential qualifications to start working in the industry.

CITB Site Management Safety Training Scheme (SMSTS) – This course is designed for workers who have responsibilities planning, monitoring, controlling, organising or administering groups of staff. It is suitable for professionals in the following roles: Site Manager. Project Manager. Health and Safety Manager.

CITB Site Supervisor Safety Training Scheme (SSSTS) This course is designed for those who have or are soon to have, supervisory responsibilities within the construction industry. For example: Team Leader / Foremen / First Line Managers. This is a CITB accredited training course.

CITB Health & Safety Awareness For anyone working in the construction industry. This is a mandatory course for any construction civil engineering industry worker. CITB accredited training is designed to make sure workers are aware of dangers and potential risks when working on a construction site. Delegates are required to complete this 1-day course in order to apply for a CSCS Card.

For more information on specific courses and career paths, get in touch today to speak to one of our industry specialists or visit our website for more information on the individual courses.

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