Offshore Medicals

Bi-Deltoid Test –Offered at our Training Centre
Offshore workers are now required to hold valid Bi-Deltoid certificate which has an accurate measurement of the delegates shoulder width.

From 1st April 2015, all passengers travelling offshore by helicopter will be required to sit in a seat where the nearest push-out emergency exit is compatible with their body size.

Passengers who are Extra Broad (XBR) will be required to sit in the seats or rows with direct access to a Type IV emergency exit or larger. This is not necessarily a window seat. The minimum diagonal on a Type IV exit is 27.75”.
UKOG Offshore Medical – Speak to our office to arrange
Workers who operate offshore often require medicals to clear them as safe to work. Medical assessment forms an important part of offshore operations, protecting the employee and employer from potential risks.

The UKOG medical is the most widely required offshore medical and workers are required to hold a valid in-date certificate before departing.

The UKOG Offshore medical is valid for two years and allows you to work in the UK sector and North Sea.

The medical consists of:

• Screening
• Completion of Patient Questionnaire
• Urinalysis – routine urine test with immediate result
• BMI – measurement of height, weight and calculation of Body Mass Index
• Near Distance and Colour Vision
• Pulse and Blood Pressure Measurement
• Lung Function Test (peak flow)
• Audiogram (hearing test)
• Consultation with a doctor
Chester Step Test – Speak to our office to arrange
The Chester Step Test is designed to test the general fitness of a delegate and is often a pre-requisite for working in roles requiring a basic level of physical fitness.

What is involved?
Your maximum heart rate will be calculated (220 – Age) and then 80% of your maximum heart rate. These values will be entered in the appropriate box on the Chester Step Test Record sheet and two horizontal lines will be drawn on the graph to represent these values.

A heart rate monitor will be attached to you, and you will be told what will be required of you during the test, followed by a brief demonstration of the initial stepping rate (15 steps /min).

When the CD is turned on your will be encouraged to commence stepping at the appropriate stepping rate, and will continue to step for the next 2 minutes. After the first 2 minutes of stepping (stage 1) your heart rate will be recorded during the last few seconds of stepping. (You may also be asked to indicate your rating of perceived exertion (RPE) from a chart numbered 6 to 20, low scores being very, very light exertion and high scores being very, very hard exertion).

Providing your heart rate is below 80% of your maximum heart rate and the RPE is below 14, you’ll be asked to continue stepping at the slightly faster rate in stage 2 (20 steps/min).

After another 2 minutes of stepping your heart rate will be recorded during the last few seconds of stage 2, and again you may be asked to indicate your RPE from the chart provided.

Providing your heart rate is below 80% of your maximum heart rate and the RPE is below 14, you’ll be asked to continue stepping at the slightly faster rate is stage 3 (25 steps/min).

The test will continue until either you report an RPE greater than 14 and/or an exercise heart rate greater than 80% of your maximum heart rate (stage 4 = 30 steps/min, stage 5 = 35 steps/min).
Bi-Deltoid Test –Offered at our Training Centre
Offshore workers are now required to hold valid Bi-Deltoid certificate which has an accurate measurement of the delegates shoulder width.

From 1st April 2015, all passengers travelling offshore by helicopter will be required to sit in a seat where the nearest push-out emergency exit is compatible with their body size.

Passengers who are Extra Broad (XBR) will be required to sit in the seats or rows with direct access to a Type IV emergency exit or larger. This is not necessarily a window seat. The minimum diagonal on a Type IV exit is 27.75”.